The influence of gaius gracchus over the political bodies of the roman republic

He chastised the people for standing by while Tiberius and his supporters were beaten and cited the unlawful sentences of exile that followed, because the accused were not permitted to stand trial.

Marcus Licinius Crassus

The people simply wanted assurances of future protection, but the senatorial elites opposed the law, claiming Tiberius was seeking a redistribution of wealth, thereby shaking the foundations of the Republic and inciting social revolution.

The bodies of Gaius, Fulvius and the three thousand supporters who also died were thrown into the Tiber, their property confiscated and sold to the public treasury. After passage of the bill he further outraged the Senate by threatening to appropriate for the purpose of land settlement revenues from the province of Asia.

The Roman Empire: The Fall of the Roman Republic

His support for the reforms of Gaius Papirius Carbo and Marcus Fulvius Flaccushis evident skills at oratory and his association with the reforms of his brother led the senatorial nobles to try him on charges plainly false or heavily exaggerated.

Gaius proposed a complex solution of the Italian question. But so strong was conservative opposition to him that he came in only fourth at the polls. During the third century Rome suffered from a cycle of near-constant conflict. Secondary roads were extended throughout Italy, to facilitate trade and communication.

Rome then fought a series of wars known as the Punic Wars with Carthage, a powerful city-state in northern Africa. Gracchus, commonly known as the Gracchi, were Roman political reformers who, through their use of the plebeian tribunate, set Roman politics on a course that ended in the collapse of the republic.

Later, following the murder of his brother, statues of both were placed throughout the city in prominent locations, where they were worshiped as heroes of the People, sometimes even being sacrificed to as if they were gods. Hardly any substantial reform was proposed in the last century of the republic that did not owe its conception to the political intelligence of Gaius Gracchus.

Gaius was also an electrifying orator and a more astute politician than his brother. There, because of his influence with the Sardinians, Gaius persuaded them to help relieve the plight of the Roman soldiers stationed on the island.

The Senate armed itself and commanded all the equestrians to arm themselves and two of their servants and assemble the next morning. Voters are not necessarily equal in group-voting systems; if one is in a smaller group, his individual vote counts for more.

Gaius's Lex Militaris provided for the free issue of clothes and equipment to soldiers, shortened the term of military service and forbade the draft of boys under the age of seventeen.

While the measure was eminently fair, Tiberius angered traditionalists by taking his bill directly to the people without consulting the Senate. He returned from there in B.

But so strong was conservative opposition to him that he came in only fourth at the polls. This is seen clearly in his regulation for the annual assignment of provinces to the consuls, the most important policy-making moment in the Roman year. He instituted various social reforms, won numerous military victories and allowed Roman literature, art, architecture and religion to flourish.

In BC, he became a quaestor in the Roman province of Sardiniawhere his merits advanced his good reputation. He was accused of unlawfully abandoning his post, but won popular support when he pointed out that he had served twelve years - two more than the basic requirement - and had been quaestor for two years though legally only required to serve one.

However, this law was largely ignored [9] and rich landowners continued to acquire land through fictitious tenants initially before transferring the land directly to themselves.

Gaius Gracchus

But their liberalism and overzealous desire to correct existing abuses brought them into collision with senatorial conservatives who killed them. Hostilius Mancinus in B. The term of office for each was one year, and reelection was rare.

Considerable portions survive of the text of what must be either the actual judiciary law of Gaius or a revised version modelled closely upon it. In the event, his proposed legislation was neither credible nor beneficial to the commons, and was intended merely to undermine Gaius.

The Senate convinced Fannius, whose friendship with Gaius had run its course, to expel all those who were not Roman citizens by birth from the city.

Gaius served with Scipio Aemilianus at Numantia in Spain. Gaius Gracchus showed how a tribune with the backing of the city poor and the equestrians could maneuver successfully against the senatorial leadership. The gap between rich and poor widened as wealthy landowners drove small farmers from public land, while access to government was increasingly limited to the more privileged classes.

Rome eventually collapsed under the weight of its own bloated empire, losing its provinces one by one: As tribune, he introduced some 15 reform measures.Early Rome: The Republic and Government StructureDEMOCRACY AND EQUALITYSourcesThree Branches. Much like the modern U.S. government, most of the government of ancient Rome can be divided into three branches: legislative, executive, and judicial.

There are, however, some differences in function, and the Roman government had at least one important component (the Senate) which does. The next historical blog-post will deal with the political career of Tiberius’ younger brother, Gaius Sempronius Gracchus, and with the short and long-term effects of the brothers’ political careers on the fate of the Roman republic at home and abroad.

Tiberius and Gaius Sempronius GracchusTiberius Sempronius (ca. B.C.) and Gaius Sempronius (ca. B.C.) Gracchus, commonly known as the Gracchi, were Roman political reformers who, through their use of the plebeian tribunate, set Roman politics on a course that ended in the collapse of the republic.

Source for information on Tiberius and Gaius Sempronius Gracchus: Encyclopedia. Serious political violence would erupt again with the rise of another populares tribune--Gaius Gracchus, the brother of Tiberius Gracchus. In both BC and BC, Gaius was elected tribune of the people. Sep 01,  · Watch video · A popular uprising was said to have arisen over the rape of a virtuous noblewoman, Lucretia, by the king’s son.

Ancient Rome

Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus (in B.C. and B.C., respectively) ended. Over the course of his lifetime he flew through the political ladder in the Roman Republic and set forth a new way of ruling as a dictator.

He was born as Gaius Julius Read More.

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The influence of gaius gracchus over the political bodies of the roman republic
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